A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzabar


A is for Aden and Z is for Zanzibar... Now what is between? For the world wide classical era philatelist and stamp collector, a country specific philatelic survey is offered with two albums: Big Blue, aka Scott International Part 1 (checklists available), and Deep Blue, aka William Steiner's Stamp Album Web PDF pages. Interested? So into the Blues...

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Spanish Guinea

1909 Scott 94 50c dark violet "Alfonso XIII"
Quick History
Spanish Guinea, located in western Africa originally between the French Congo (then Gabon , also French Equatorial Africa) and Cameroon on the Gulf of Guinea, was a Spanish protectorate (1885), and then a Spanish colony, beginning in 1900.

Rio Muni (Spanish Guinea)
Until 1909, Spanish Guinea actually only consisted of the continental territory known as Rio Muni, after a river flowing through the region. Bata, a military post on the coast, was the capital. (Bata is still the largest city on the mainland.)

Spanish Guinea (Rio Muni)
(Year labeling on the map is initial influence of the European Power)
Stamps issued for the Rio Muni territory from 1902-1909 were labeled "Guinea Espanola" and "Guinea (Continental) Espanola".

But there were other Spanish  colonies on islands in the Gulf of Guinea: namely Fernando Po with the important settlement Santa Isabel and administrative capital (Stamp production 1868-1908, 1929), and Elobey, Annobon & Corisco (Stamp production 1903-1910).

(For more background on the history and stamps, see the Fernando Po and Elobey (Grand and Chico), Annobon & Corisco blog post links above. Also, for much more history, as well as a great synthesis map, check out Gerben's wonderful Stamp World History website here and here. )

In 1909, "Spanish Guinea (Rio Muni)" is expanded administratively to include:
Fernando Po, and  Elobey, Annobon & Corisco"
Then, in 1909, the administration- for all intents and purposes- of all the Spanish colonies in the area was subsumed under "Spanish Guinea", with Santa Isabel on Fernando Po island the most important settlement. (The formal legal changes were not made, though, until 1926.)

Cacao, coffee, and logging were the main economic activities.

Stamps from 1909 for the territories was issued under "Spanish Territories of the Gulf of Guinea", and Fernando Po and Elobey, Annobon & Corisco stamp production ceased (except for a 1929 production from Fernando Po). Spanish Guinea, under this new amalgamation, lasted until 1960. 

Spain tried to keep the territory by making it "provincial"  from 1960-68, but that didn't work.

Full independence was achieved in 1968, and Equatorial Guinea was born.

Of interest, the Michel catalogue keeps the 1909-1959 issues separate as the Spanish Territories in the Gulf of Guinea, while the other major catalogues lumps all these issues under Spanish Guinea.

Equatorial Guinea
As a legacy, Equatorial Guinea is the only independent African nation in which Spanish is the official language. The population in 2012 is a small 1.6 million. Malabo (the former Santa Isabel) on Bioko island (Fernando Po) is the capital. Of interest, Equatorial Guinea is now a large oil producer, and is the richest country per capita in Africa, although the wealth is distributed very unevenly. 20% of children die before age 5, and 50% do not have access to clean drinking water. Human trafficking is a major problem, and the current authoritarian regime in power has one of the worst human rights records on the entire planet.

1912 Scott 117 5c deep green "Alfonso XIII"
Into the Deep Blue
The 2014 Scott Classic Specialized 1840-1940 catalogue has, for Spanish Guinea 1902-1940, 319 major descriptive numbers. Of those, 177 are CV <$1-$1+, or 55% of the total. Clearly, a healthy portion of the stamps of Spanish Guinea are inexpensive for the WW classical era collector.

Now one just needs to find them. ;-)  As a general rule in my experience, Spanish colony stamps are underrepresented in feeder albums and collections in the United States. So, although inexpensive, also not common.

A closer look at the stamps and issues
100 Centimos = 1 Peseta

Recall that Spanish Guinea only included the Rio Muni area beginning in 1902, and stamps of Spanish Guinea were issued and used only for Rio Mundi. Fernando Po, and Elobey, Annobon and Corisco had their own stamp issues.

Beginning in 1909, all of these territories came under the administration of Spanish Guinea, and Spanish Guinea stamps were used.

1909 Scott 85 1c orange brown
"King Alfonso XIII"
The "Rio Muni" era (1902-09) consists of seven issues with 90 stamps. Most issues reflect the "Alfonso XIII" key type issued as well for other Spanish colonies, but there was also a surcharged 1903 and Revenue issue, and an overprinted 1906 issue, using the stamps of Elobey, Annobon, and Corisco.

Long story short- I have none of them at the moment, although 30 are CV <$1-$1+. (Didn't I mention that Spanish colony stamps are not that common in U.S. based WW collections? ;-)

Consequently, the coverage review begins with the 1909 "Spanish Territories of the Gulf of Guinea" era, when Spanish Guinea consisted of all the Spanish colonies around the Gulf of Guinea: Rio Muni, Fernando Po, and Elobey, Annobon, and Corisco.

The 1909 issue has thirteen stamps, and the CV is <$1 for 10 of them.

Blue Control Numbers on Back
As is typical for many Spanish issues, there is a control number on the back of the stamp.

1912 Scott 118 10c red "Alfonso XIII"
The 13 stamp 1912 issue has another portrait of Alfonso XIII. Most of the issues for Spanish Guinea are printed by typography, as is this one. Note the "Santa Isabel/ Fernando Po" cancellation?

1914 Scott 134 25c dark blue "Alfonso XIII"
The 1914 issue has thirteen stamps, ten of which are CV <$1.

Alphonse Leon Ferdinand Mary James Isidore Pascal Anthony of Bourbon and Habsburg-Lorraine was King of Spain from 1886 to 1931. He was a monarch from birth, although his mother (Maria Christina of Austria) served as his regent until his 16th birthday. Because he had family ties to both sides of the conflict, he kept Spain neutral during WW I.

1914 Scott 137 50c deep claret
This is another stamp from the 1914 issue, but cancelled Santa Isabel/ Fernando Po.

1917 Scott 152 4p lilac "Alfonso XIII"
Stamps of 1912 Overprinted
The 1917 overprinted issue, using the stamps of 1912, consists of 13 stamps. Although the 5c to 1p nine stamp denominations are CV <$1, the 1c and 2c values are CV $80+! I'm sure there is a story behind this, but the Scott catalogue does not elaborate.

1919 Scott 158 1c lilac "Alfonso XIII"
The 1919 issue has thirteen stamps, and the CV for 10 stamps is <$1. I note that Scott lists a 165a 25c blue (error in color) as CV $60+, as the normal color is green. By presumption, the blue color for the 20c must have been used by mistake for the 25c. I assume this is documented as the cause of the error. But, in general, if one finds a blue stamp that should be green, that is usually a chemical changeling in my experience.

I should mention that the blue control number on the back of this 1c stamp is A000,000. ! ? I'm not sure why, could this have been a "specimen" stamp?

1919 Scott 164 25c green
Here is another stamp from the 1919 issue. I believe all my cancelled examples are from Santa Isabel.

1920 Scott 179 40c light brown "Alfonso XIII"
The 1920 issue has thirteen stamps. Many of the stamp issues for Spanish Guinea are rather poorly centered, and the typographic print is nothing to write home about, either. ;-)

1922 Scott 191 30c violet "Alfonso XIII"
The 1922 issue has thirteen stamps, with eleven @ CV <$1-$1+. Getting tired of Alfonso XIII portraits?

1924 Scott 203 40c dull blue & black "Nipa House"
The nest 12 stamp issue of 1924 is a nice pictorial  bi-colored of "Nipa House".

The "Nipa House" was apparently the residence of the governor.  "Nipa" refers to, I believe, a stilt design.

1924 Scott 202 30c orange & black "Nipa House"
A 30c orange & black from the 1924 issue SON.

1929 Scott 213 25c bright rose 
"Santa Maria  and View of Seville"
Seville-Barcelona Issue of  Spain, Overprinted in Red or Blue
For the international exhibition in Seville-Barcelona, the 1929 Issue of Spain was overprinted for Spanish Guinea on eleven stamps, as well as for Fernando Po, Spanish Morocco, and Spanish Sahara.

1931 Scott 225 20c deep violet "Porter"
A three design fourteen stamp issue ("Porter", "Drummers", "Alfonso XIII and Queen Victoria") was produced in 1931. Locally themed issues are always more interesting.

This 1931 issue was overprinted "Republica Espanola" in 1931 in black, and in 1933 in red or blue. A republic was established in Spain in 1931.

1926 Scott B9 60c myrtle green "Alfonso XIII"
Red Cross Issue
Types of Semi-postal Stamps of Spain, 1926
Overprinted in Black or Blue
In 1926, the semi-postal "Red Cross Issue" of Spain was overprinted for Spanish Guinea on twelve stamps. The 1926 Red Cross Issue can also be found overprinted for Spanish Morocco and Spanish Sahara.

Deep Blue
1914 Issue of Spanish Guinea in Deep Blue
Deep Blue (Steiner) has 17 pages for the stamps of Spanish Guinea. All major numbers have a space.

1914 Scott 129 2c carmine rose "Alfonso XIII"
Big Blue
Big Blue '69, on four pages, has 104 spaces for the stamps of Spanish Guinea.

Coverage is 33%.

BB could have been more generous, as there are a number of CV <$1 stamps not given a space. And the 1917 overprinted issue (nine stamps CV <$1) is left out. But, considering the lack of availability of Spanish Guinea stamps in most collections, perhaps that is for the better. ;-)

The coverage is located between Spain and Spanish Morocco in the '69.

The 40s editions have less coverage, as the '69 adds 1926 Semi-postal B6-B12 (nine spaces).

There are no "expensive" (threshold CV $10) stamps needed in BB.  The most costly stamps are in the  $6-$7 range

Checklist

(Rio Muni area only)
1902
1,2,

1903
9,10,11,

1905
27,28,

1907
58,59,60,61,62,(64),

(Now includes Rio Muni, Fernando Po, Elobey, Annobon and Corisco)
1909
85,86,87,88,89,90,91,(92),

1912
115,116,117,118,119,120,121,

1914
128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135,

1919
158,159,160,161,162,163,164,

1920
171,172,173,174,175,176,177,

Next Page

1922
184,185,186,187,188,189,190,

1924
197,198,199,200,201,202,

1929
209,210,211,213,212,

1931-35
220,221,222,223,224,225,
226,227,228,229,230,231,

1931-33*
234 or 248, 235 or 249, 236 or 250, 237 or 251, 238 or 252, 239 or 253,

Next Page

1931-33*
240 or 254, 241 or 255, 242 or 246, 243 or 257,
244 or 258, 245 or 259,

Next Page

Semi-Postal
1926
B3,B1,B2,B6,
B4,B5,B7,B8,B9,

B10,B11,B12,

Comments
A) Expensive stamps ($10 threshold): None
B) (   ) around a number indicates a blank space choice.
C) *1931-33: Various types of overprints (the 1931 and 1933 issue) are admitted based on BB's criteria. Each stamp space, then, can have either the 1931 or the 1933 example.

1917 Scott 149 40c carmine rose "Alfonso XIII"
Stamps of 1912 Overprinted
Out of the Blue
With 177 Spanish Guinea stamps with CV <$1-$1+, cost should not be a factor. Now I need to find them. ;-)

Note: Maps appear to be in the public domain. The Rio Mudi map, which I cropped from the original, is from an upload at Stamp Community Family Forum by Rodney Allen (Rod222) of Perth, Australia fame, who has given me general permission to use his uploads for the blog. Thanks Rod!

Have a comment?

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Spain

1851 Scott 6 6c black "Queen Isabella II"
Quick History
Spain, on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe, emerged already in the 15th century as a unified country. And, through its global colonial empire, the culture and Castilian language of Spain spread and encompasses some 500 million world citizens today.

Spain
The capital is Madrid, and the population was 26,000,000 in 1944.

The Spanish Empire and Aftermath 
(Enlarge for examination)
Bypassing much history in order to be closer to the philatelic era....

Ferdinand VII (1814-1833) was restored as absolute monarch in 1823 with the help of the French. He returned conservative policies, restored the Jesuits, and reinstated the Spanish Inquisition. As he had only a female heir presumptive, and not wanting to have his reactionary brother Infante Carlos of Spain  succeed him, he declared the "Pragmatic Sanction" in 1830, enabling his infant daughter Isabella to become Queen.

With Ferdinand's death in 1833 at age 49, three year old Isabella became "Queen", although her mother Maria Christina was named regent for her daughter. Carlos, however, declared himself the rightful heir, and hence there was some 50 years of unrest and (Carlist) civil war. 

Isabella II 1843-1868 Reign
Isabella II assumed majority rule in 1843 when she was only thirteen years old.

She held the title Her Majesty Queen Isabella II, The Queen of Spain until 1870.

Actually, her full title at the beginning of her monarchy was:

Isabella II by the Grace of God, Queen of Castile, Leon, Aragon, of the Two Sicilies, of Jerusalem, of Navarre, of Granada, of Toledo, of Valencia, of Galicia, of Majorca, of Seville, of Sardinia, of Córdoba, of Corsica, of Murcia, of Menorca, of Jaén, the Algarves, Algeciras, Gibraltar, the Canary Islands, of the East and West Indies, Islands and Mainland of the Ocean Sea; Archduchess of Austria; Duchess of Burgundy, Brabant, Milan and Aspurg; Countess of Flanders, Tirol and Barcelona; Lady of Biscay and Molina

Queen Isabella II of Spain in exile
Spain was not very effectual as a nation during Isabella's reign, and blaming in part the Queen, in 1868 the army defected to the revolutionary generals (Glorious Revolution era, Provisional Government 1868-71). The Queen was forced into exile, retired from Spanish politics, and lived in Paris until her death in 1904.

But she is remembered fondly by philatelists and postal historians, because her visage is on the very first postage stamp of Spain of 1850. And she is literally the "face" of Spanish stamps until 1868, with 22 stamp visage and/or  frame different designs.

Recounting the entire turbulent history of Spain during the philatelic era would require an encyclopedic review. I will only give a very brief synopsis here because I will be focusing on the Isabella II period in the "closer look" section.

In short: The monarchy continued in variable health until 1931, when Spain became a republic. The ultranationalist totalitarian regime of General Francisco Franco was established after the 1936-39 Civil War.

1853 Scott 19 6c carmine rose "Isabella II"
Into the Deep Blue
The 2014 Scott Classic Specialized 1840-1940 catalogue has, for Spain 1850-1940 ( a few issues go to 1947) - 1171 major stamp descriptions. Of those 1,057 are the "usual" categories. Then, there are 114 stamps for 1873-75 Carlist stamps and 1936-37 Revolutionary overprints.

For the 1171 major stamp descriptions, 569 are CV <$1-$1+, or 48%. There are many Spanish stamps during the classical era that are inexpensive for the WW collector. Naturally, earlier issues are more expensive.

Spain's stamps also reflect the reality that there have been changes in government.

Kingdom 1850-1869
Provisional Government 1868-1869
Duke de la Torre Regency 1870
Kingdom 1872-1873
First Republic 1873-1874
Kingdom 1875-1930
Revolutionary Issues 1931
Republic 1931-1938
Spanish State 1936-1947
Also...
Carlist stamps 1873-1875
Revolutionary Overprints 1936-1937

A through review of Spanish classical era stamps would take 3-4 blog posts. Rather, I will concentrate on the earlier stamps- the 1850-1869 Kingdom period of Queen Isabella II. I am particularly attracted to the design of these stamps- and it finally dawned on me why- the reason may surprise you. ;-)

Note: I checked the stamps shown here on this blog post with genuine/forgery markers as described/illustrated in The Serrane Guide c1998 APS edition, and did not detect any obvious forgeries. Perhaps comforting, but that is still no guarantee. ;-)

A closer look at the stamps and issues
32 Maravedis = 8 Cuartos = 1 Real
1000 Milesimas = 1 Centimos = 1 Escudo (1866)
100 Milesimas = 1 Real
4 Reales = 1 Peseta
100 Centimos = 1 Peseta (1872)
1850 Scott 1 6c black, thin paper, Type II
Queen Isabella II
Lithography, Imperforate
The first 1850 stamp issue for Spain had five stamps, two vignette and five frame designs, was imperforate (naturally), and was printed by lithography.

The 6c black, shown above, is found on thick or thin paper, and either Type I or Type II. For Type II, the "T" and "O" are joined in "CUARTOS".

It had the image of the queen at the age of twenty.

Note the "Spider" cancellation, quite characteristic for the earlier issues. Apparently, the Queen was rather vain about her appearance; approving a cancelling device that did not "deface" when struck directly. ;-)

1851 Scott 9 5r rose "Isabella II"
Thin Paper
The 1851 six stamp issue was typographed, and has the same design for all six denominations. My copies are on quite transparent paper (pelure?), although the 6c black can also be found on thick paper.

Note the "spider" cancellations.

Be aware that the earlier Spain stamp issues (1850-1861, 1864, and 1866) do not have the country name (Espana) on them.

I mentioned earlier that I seem to have a particular attraction to these "Isabella II" designs- specifically the "queenly" coiffure?

There was something very familiar, pleasing, and comforting about it.

And then it dawned. !!

Princess Leia's "Cinnamon Bun" Hairstyle
Princess Leia's "queenly" hairstyle in the Starwars films! 

1852 Scott 12 6c rose "Isabella II"
Thick Paper
The 1852 five stamp issue (one design) is usually found on thick paper. (Thin paper, except for the 6c, might be forgeries.)

Note the "Grid" cancellation, which is found not uncommonly on the earlier stamps.

Be aware that the Scott catalogue lists many minor numbers for the earlier issues of Spain for color variations. But the generally expensive nature ($ hundreds) for the stamps of early Spain precludes, however, much dabbling in this area by WW collectors. ;-)

1853 Scott 22 5r light green "Isabella II"
Thin Paper
The 1853 seven stamps issue on mostly thin paper has the "Arms of Madrid" (not shown) and this queen design.

It should be quite obvious by now that the earlier issues (1850-1854) have the year date on them- helpful!

1854 Scott 25 4c carmine 
"Coat of Arms of Spain"; Thin White Paper
The 1854 seven stamp issue on thin white paper changes the design to show the "Coat of Arms of Spain".

1854 Scott 26 6c carmine; Thin White Paper
"Coat of Arms of Spain"; Remainder cancel
Stamps of 1854-1882 cancelled with three bars (as shown) or two thin horizontal lines are remainders. They generally sell for less (or much less) than the expensive CV stamps: paradoxically, for the inexpensive stamps, the remainders are sometimes worth a bit more CV!

If one is concerned about forgeries (as one should be) for the earlier Spanish issues, a "remainder" can serve as an inexpensive genuine template for comparison to an "unknown" example. (Thanks Keijo for the tip!)

1854 Scott 32 4c carmine
Thick Bluish Paper
Paper is often a distinguishing characteristic of the earlier issues, and here the 1854 five stamp issue, which is found on thick bluish paper, are given major numbers by Scott.

1855 Scott 37 4c brown red "Isabella II"
Blue Paper, Wmk 104
In 1855, a new design on four stamps was issued. Note the "year date" is no longer there.

This design is given major Scott numbers for April 1, 1855, January 1, 1856, and April 11, 1856 issues, distinguished by paper and watermark.

For the 1855 issue, look for blue paper and a Wmk 104 "Loops" watermark. Because of the watermark on genuine stamps, they should be easily distinguished  from forgeries.

1856 Scott 41 4c rose
Rough Yellowish paper; Wmk 105
The January 1, 1856 four stamp issue is found on rough yellowish paper, and Wmk 105 "Crossed Lines" watermark. Again, the watermark should help to determine genuines.  (Note, generally speaking, the paper characteristics and tints are more apparent with the real stamp in hand, and not so evident with the scans.)

Wmk 104: "Loops"; Wmk 105: "Crossed Lines"
O.K., but what do the watermarks look like?  Well, here they are. ;-)

1856 Scott 45 4c rose
White Smooth Paper; Unwmk
The April 11, 1856 issue - four stamps- is on white smooth paper, and unwatermarked. According to Varro Tyler (Focus on Forgeries- c2000), there are twelve different postal forgeries known for this stamp- as well as a few philatelic forgeries. (Generally, most of the lithographic forgeries found for early Spanish stamps were made to defraud the Post Office.)

Since this issue is unwatermarked, how to tell genuines?

* The 73 pearls surrounding the head of the queen are comparatively large, uniform, and well rounded. (Forgeries not so much.)
* All the letters in "CORREOS" and "CUARTOS" are well-formed, the "C"s have serifs at top and bottom, and the tails of the "S"'s are as long as the tops.
* The queen's eye clearly has a visible pupil.

1860 Scott 53 1r blue/green
Tinted Paper
The 1860-61 six stamp issue had this design, and was on various colored tinted paper, as was the next two issues (1862,1864). The queen, although only age thirty, has perhaps lost her "rosebud" freshness? 

1862 Scott 60 2r green/pinkish
Tinted Paper
A jowly queen was portrayed on the 1862 six stamp issue.The CV for this issue (and the preceding 1860 issue) is more modest, with with ten stamps <$1-$10+.

Note this is the first issue with "ESPANA" on the stamp?

1864 Scott 63 12c green/pinkish
Tinted Paper
For 1864, a six stamp issue with this visage was produced.

If I am reading the catalogue correctly, save for the initial 1850 issues, all subsequent issues up to and including this one were printed by typography.

There was also an 1866 three stamp issue (not illustrated) with the above design, except the year tablet has "1866".

1865 Scott 69 12c blue & rose; "A13" Design
Lithography*, (Actually very likely Typographic) Imperforate
The 1865 seven stamp issue- several bi-colored- was printed by lithography*, as were the issues through 1869, (or so the Scott catalogue states!!).

(*But Ralf, who collects the postal history of Spain, says, in the comments section, that this is not true.

Ralf says..

". All Spanish stamps - with the exception of the 1850 (lithography) and the 1876 (engraved) - issued between 1851 and 1889/1900 were printed by tipography - no exception. It's all a simple error in the Scott catalogue, passed on through all editions. "

I have no reason to doubt Ralf, who is a Spanish specialist. But it is sometimes difficult to determine between lithographic and typographic printed stamps. I will leave the "Scott lithographic attribution" in until I confirm the error, but I am inclined to agree with Ralf, that, most likely these 1865-69 issues were indeed printed by Typography.)

This was the last of the general issue imperforates.

1865 Scott 75 4c blue
Perf. 14
The perforated 1865 seven stamp issue used the same "A13" design and denominations as the 1865 imperforate issue. Some colors are a bit different compared to the imperforate isssue.

Scott has a note that the 1865- 1950 perforated stamps for Spain tend to be poorly centered. Certainly, the stamp above is an example of that. ;-)

1866 Scott 82 4c blue
This 1866 four stamp issue is the last one found during the "Isabella II" era that does not have an "ESPANA" label. CV is <$1-$10+ for two stamps.


1867 Scott 90 12c orange yellow (A15b design)
The first six stamps of the 1867-68 issue have the same visage, but each stamp denomination has their own frame design.

1867 Scott 89 4c blue (A15a design)
The 4c blue shows the A15a design, while the preceding 12c orange illustrates the A15b design.

1867 Scott 97 50m bister brown
The 1867-68 issue continues with four more stamps (ten total). The 5m and 10m stamps have a "number" design, while the 25m and 50m (illustrated above)  shows the same queen visage as before with a change in frame.

CV for the 10 stamp 1867-68 issue is <$1-$10+ for six stamps.

1868 Scott 99 50m violet
The last of the "Isabella II" issues (She ended up in exile in France in 1868) was the 1868-69 five stamp production, using some of the preceding 1867-68 designs, but with new colors and some new denominations.

Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown. !

This is the end of the "Isabella II" section, but I would be remiss if I did not show at least one genuine /forgery comparison for Spain, which tends to have their share. ;-)

1930 Scott C14 25c dark blue "Plane and Congress Seal"
 Railway Congress Airmail Issue
Genuine-Forgery
The lithographic 1930 Railway Congress airmail issue  was only valid for postage for three days, and consisted of only 25,000 sets. Excellent lithographic forgeries far outnumber genuines in collections today. For myself, I have a complete set of the forgeries, but only one genuine stamp. 

One may note that the forgery impression appears to be on whiter paper, and the impression is not as well printed as the genuine stamp.

Control number on back in blue
Genuine: "A", followed by an actual number
Forgery: A000,000
Varro Tyler, in his book "Focus on Forgeries -c2000",states, that ordinarily (could be exceptions?), the forgery does not show a real control marking number, but "A000,000". Clearly, that is a helpful difference if one finds this "A000,000" marker on a stamp: Forgery!

Forgery: Prominent single Dot touching under the horizontal line
below and between "9" and "3" of "1930" in the Congress Seal area
Varro Tyler points out the prominent single dot touching the underside of the horizontal line that separates the dot field from the "1930" tablet found with the forgeries as shown above.

He compares that to the genuine as shown below....

Genuine: Small (non prominent) dot seen with genuine
stamp in the same area.
For the genuines, no dot is seen apparently with the naked eye in the same area, or- with a very closeup scan (@1200) , a small dot is revealed- but it is not prominent as found with the forgeries.

Such are the subtle differences with this most excellent forgery. ;-)

Deep Blue
1860-61 & 1862 Issues in Deep Blue
Deep Blue (Steiner) has 94 pages for the classical era stamps of Spain. All of the major Scott numbers have a space. One will also need to add quadrilled pages for additional stamps accumulated (those not in the catalogue presently, minor number varieties, etc).

1860 Scott 50 4c orange/green "Isabella II"
Big Blue
Big Blue "69, on 23 pages, has 567 spaces for the stamps of Spain. BB's coverage is 48%. Categories include regular, semi-postal, air post, semi-postal air post, air post special delivery, official, official air post, special delivery, semi-postal special delivery, postal tax, and delivery tax. Categories not included in BB are war tax, franchise, carlist stamps, and revolutionary overprints. Of interest, Spain never issued postage due stamps.

The BB 1940s editions appear to be identical, except for some minor rearrangement, and the "69 edition has spaces for Special Delivery E4 & E5.

For interest, here is the stamp space count in BB for the top countries.

762 Germany
755 Austria
752 France
644* United States
620 Hungary
617 Italy
582 Salvador
569 Nicaragua
567 Spain

Spain has the ninth slot for stamp space count in BB.
*Note: The U.S. has more than 644 spaces, but I didn't include cut squares.

Big Blue has forty spaces that require a stamp with a CV $10+: seven of which are in the "most expensive" category ($35+).  For specifics, see the "comments" section below the checklist. The most costly is the 1938 Scott 613 5p dark brown "Bomb Throwing"($200)!!!, from an issue honoring the militia, and only available from the Philatelic Agency.

Be aware that the "Barcelona Exposition Issue" ....

Postal Tax
1929-31
“RA1”,”RA2”,”RA3”,”RA4”,”RA5”,”RA6”,
“RA7”,”RA8”,”RA9”,”RA10”,”RA11”,”RA12”,

....are dropped (not active) Scott numbers, as this issue is no longer in the catalogue.

Also, there are color descriptive changes for some spaces between today's Scott catalogue and Big Blue. I didn't comment (except for one space), as it should cause no particular confusion.

Checklist

1851
6,

1852
12,

1854
25 or 32, 26 or 32A, (Choice not taken- 25 or 32 or 26 or 32A),

1853
19,

1865
75,

1855-56
37, 39 or 43 or 47, 36 or 40 or 44, 46,

1860-61
50,51,54,(53),

1862
55,56,57,59,60,

1864
62,63,

1866
82,83,

1867
90,93,

1868
99,

1870
159,161,163,164,165,166,(167),

1872-73
174,176,181,182,185,(186),190,

Next Page

1873
191,193,196,197,

1874
201,202,203,

1874
211,

1875
212,214,

1876
222,223,225,227,

1878
232,234,236,(238),

1882
252,253,254,

1879
242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249,

1889
255,257,259,261,262,263,264,
265,266,267,268,

1899
256,258,260,

1900
272,273,274,275,278,279,

Next Page

1900
280,281,283,284,

1902-05
276,277,282,

1905
287,288,289,290,

1909-17
297,298,299,310,300,301,302,303,

1909-17
304, 305a or 305, 306,

1920
314,

1922-25
331,332,334 or 335,

1922-25
336,337,338,339,340,341,342,343,

1921
318,319,320,321,322,323,

Next Page

1929
345,346,347,348,350,

1929
349,351,

1930
373,374,375,

1930
376,377,378,379,380,
386,387,388,389,390,391,
392,393,394,395,396,

Next Page

1930
397,400,401,402,
406,407,408,409,411,413,414,
418,419,420,421,422,
423,424,425,426,
428,429,

Next Page

1930
427,429,
433,434,435,436,437,
438,439,440,441,
442,443,444,445,
1930-31
468,469,470,471,472,473,474,
478,479,480,481,482,483,(485),

Next Page

1931-34
491,492,493,494,
495,496,498,497,
501,502,503,504,505,
506,507,508,509,510,
516,517,518,520,521,522,523,
526,528,532,534,538, ( 516-538*), (516-538*)
*Choice not taken with or without control number on back, or imperforate

Next Page

1933-37 (actually -38)
542,539,540, Air Post C72A or 72B,
546,547,548,549,545,550,

1935
552,553,554,555,556,

1936
557,558,559,560,
561,562,563,564,565,
566,567,568,

Next Page

1936-37
569,570,571,
574,577,576,578,580,581,

1937-38
582,583,

1938
585,

1938
604,605,

1938-39
592,593,594,595,596,597,598,
599,600,601,602,603,

Next Page

1938-39
606,607,608,609,
610,611,612,613,

Nationalist Issues
1936-38
625,628,633,626,627,629,
630,631,632,635,636,
637,641 or 642,643,665,666 or 666A,
644,645,646,647 or 648,649,650,651,652,

Next Page

1938-40
638,640,656 or 658,659,660,657 or 661,
668,669,670,671,672,673,
674,675,676,677,678 or 693,679,
680, 681 or 697, 682,683 or 699,684,685 or 701,
686,687,688,

Next Page

Semi-Postal
B1,B2,B3,B4,B5,
B6,B7,B8,B9,B10,
B14,B15,B16,

1926
B17,

1927
B19,B20,B21,
B22,B23,B24,B25,

Next Page

(Semi-Postal)
1927
B26,B27,B28,B47,
B48,B50,B52,
B55,B56,
B57,B58,B59,

1928
B74,B75,B76,

Next Page

(Semi-Postal)
1928
B77,B78,B79,
B80,B81,B82,
B83,B84,B85,
B90,B91,B92,
B93,B94,B95,
B96,B97,B98,

Next Page

(Semi-Postal)
1928
B99,B100,B101,

1938
B106,B108,B107,
B109,B110,B111,B112,
B113,B114,

Next Page

Postal Tax
1929-31*
“RA1”,”RA2”,”RA3”,”RA4”,”RA5”,”RA6”,
“RA7”,”RA8”,”RA9”,”RA10”,”RA11”,”RA12”,
*Old Scott numbers- issue no longer in catalogue

1939
RA13,

Air Post Special Delivery
1930

CE1,
Delivery tax stamp

1930
ER1,

Semi-Postal Special Delivery
1940
EB2,

Next Page

Semi-Postal Air Post
CB1,CB2,CB3,CB4,

1926
CB5,

1940
CB8,CB9,CB10,
CB11,CB12,CB13,

Air Post
1920
C1,C2,C3,C4,C5,

1929
C6,C7,C8,C9,C10,C11,

Next Page

(Air Post)
1930
C12*,C13,C14,C15,C16,C17,
C18,C19,C20,C21,
C22,C23,C24,C25,C26,
C27,C28,C29,C30,
C31,C32,C33,

Next Page

(Air Post)
1930
C34,C35,C36,C37,
C38,C39,C40,C45,C46,C47,
C43,C44,C54,C55,
C50,C51,C52,C53,
C56,C57,C62,C63,

Next Page

(Air Post)
1930-31
C64,C65,C66,C67,

1930-31
C68,C69,C70,

1936
C73,C75,

1936
C78,C81,C74,C76,C77,
C79,C80,C82,C83,C84,
C85,C86,C87,

Next Page

(Air Post)
1939*
C100,C101,
C102,C103,C105,
C107,C108,

Next Page

Official Stamps
1854
O1,O2,O3,

1855
O5,O6,O7,O8*,

1896
O10,

1916
O12 or O16, O13 or O17, O14 or O18, O15 or O19,

1931
O20,O21,O22,O23,
O24,O25,O27,O26,

Official Air Post
1931
CO1,CO2,CO3,CO4,

Next Page

Semi-Postal Special Delivery
1926
EB1,

Special Delivery
1905
E1,

1929-30
E3,E4,E5,

1929
E2,

1930-34
E6,E9,E14,

1930
E7,

1931
E13,

1936
E15,

1930
E8,

1937-39

E16 or E17, E19 or E20,

Comments
A) Expensive stamps ($10 threshold):
1855 Scott 39 2r reddish purple ($10+)
1856 Scott 44 2c blue green ($42.50)
1860 Scott 54 2r lilac/lilac ($10+)
1860 (Scott 53) 1r blue/green ($10+)
1862 Scott 55 2c deep blue/yellow ($10+)
1862 Scott 59 1r brown/yellow ($10+)
1862 Scott 60 2r green/pinkish ($10+)
1864 Scott 63 12c green/pinkish ($10+)
1866 Scott 83 12c orange  ($10+)
1867 Scott 93 20c lilac ($10+)
1870 Scott 163 4m bister brown ($10+)
1872 Scott 185 40c pale red brown ($10+)
1872 (Scott 186) 50c deep green ($10+)
1875 Scott 212 2c orange brown ($10+)
1878 Scott 232 2c mauve ($10+)
1878 (Scott 238) 50c blue green ($10+)
1879 Scott  245 20c red brown ($10+)
1931 Scott 508 20c dark violet ($30+)
1931 Scott 509 40c dull blue ($10+)
1931 Scott 510 50c dark orange ($40)
1936 Scott 571 10c red brown ($10)
1938 Scott 613 5p dark brown ($200) !
1936 Scott 633 4p rose violet, red & yellow ($20+)
1938 Scott 671 1p brown & yellow ($80)
1939 Scott 688 4p dark violet ($10+)
1926 Scott B8 30c blue green ($40)
1926 Scott B9 40c dark blue ($20+)
1926 Scott B10 50c red orange ($20+)
1927 Scott B22 10c green ($62.50)
1920 Scott C5 1p lake ($20+)
1929 Scott C10 1p green ($20+)
1929 Scott C11 4p black ($20)
1930 Scott C15 50c purple ($10+)
1930 Scott C16 1p yellow green ($30)
1930 Scott C17 4p black ($30)
1936 Scott C87 10c violet brown ($10+)
1855 Scott O8 1l black/gray blue ($10+)
1929 Scott E2 20c dull red ($10+)
1930 Scott E6 20c brown orange ($55)
1931 Scott E13 20c vermilion ($20+)
B) (  ) around a number indicates a blank space choice.
C) *C12-C17-Note: Counterfeits exist!
D) *1939 Air Post- Perf 11, not Perf 10 (1941-1947).
E) O8 - color in catalogue is "black/gray blue" rather than "blue" in BB

1864 Scott 66 2r blue/pinkish "Isabella II"
Out of the Blue
Spain would be on my short list if I ever decided to specialize. The stamp variation combined with the turbulent history- highly attractive!

Note: Maps and pics of Isabella II appear to be in the public domain.
The "Princess Leia" pic is copyright Lucasfilm/Sportphoto Ltd/Allstar 1977, and is used here under an educational exception to illustrate the "Cinnamon Bun" hairstyle. 

Comments appreciated!